Change

Change. Seasons change. People change. Jobs change. It’s inevitable. And yet it’s not something I’ve always enjoyed.

I can remember being asked by many a job interviewer: “How do you handle change?”

“Oh, me? I love change. Yes, I’m very flexible, really go with the flow.” Yeah, right.

Maybe I wasn’t completely honest, but who hasn’t put themselves in the best possible light in front of others? Easygoing. Carefree. Peaceful. All things I strive to be and qualities I want to be known for having.

Instead, I’ve often been more familiar with less-appealing words. Rigid. Planned. Stressed.

My husband is much more adventurous than I am, which is good for me. He gently nudges, and sometimes pushes, me out of my comfort zone. He’ll whisper to me: “Kendra, you’ll regret it if you don’t try.” They are words that come to my mind now even when he is not around. And so I’ve climbed mountains, gone on crazy rides, eaten exotic foods, and so many more things I would never have done on my own.

But I’ve realized that he’s right. Looking for adventure, not always having a plan, trying something new, allowing yourself to change can be fun. And freeing.

Change is good. Scary, but good.

I’ve found we were meant to experience more than just our comfort. We were meant to step out of what is familiar and dare to experience something new, something fresh, something different.

We were meant to live life fully, allowing for change. That is the only way away from words like rigid. Scared. Stressed.

We were meant to experience life and freedom.

We were meant for change.

John 10:10 [Jesus said] “I came so they can have real and eternal life, more and better life than they ever dreamed of.”

What changes have you experienced in life that have been good for you?

Kendra Egeland Roehl

Author Kendra Egeland Roehl

Kendra received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in social work and has worked for hospice programs, low-income housing, and the St. Cloud Veterans Affairs Medical Center. A mother of four, she and her husband are both foster and adoptive parents. She is a speaker and writer about topics such as marriage, motherhood, foster care, adoption, and social justice at The Ruth Experience.

More posts by Kendra Egeland Roehl

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