Healing Pains

I was lying in bed taking it easy for a day or two while my stitches were in the fresh stages of mending from a recent surgery, and I was beginning to move slowly while resting between bouts of activity.

My mind began to wonder, drifting from one random topic to the next. The memory of a former co-worker popped into my thoughts. She was jolly and friendly, but I couldn’t trust her. I remembered a day when I had arrived at my office and found her eating her lunch at my desk, and not her own desk. It was odd. She would have had to unlock my office to sit at my desk and eat. I brushed it off, since my office was the warmest in the winter months. Not too long afterwards though, I found a personal item broken. And then things began to go missing from my desk drawer. I spoke with my co-worker and with my boss, but no one claimed responsibility. Eventually, I moved on from that place of work, relieved not to have to deal with these occurrences any longer.

Over the last few years, I’ve really made an effort to forgive this co-worker and put it behind me. But as the memory floated back into my mind, I found myself reliving the anger. Suddenly, my incision had some nerve pain, jolting me back to present time.

You know the process of emotional healing seems very similar to the healing process my body was going through after surgery. Hurts can cut deep into our spirits. We stitch them up through prayer, and move forward. We start the process of choosing to forgive. But that’s not the end. Even as we begin to heal, random pangs of hurt remind us that the process of healing is still going on. We give it to God again then another memory resurfaces and we have to give it to God again. As we choose to let go of the anger and unforgiveness, trusting God, we will still have moments of discomfort. Healing takes time.

Kathy Banta

Author Kathy Banta

Kathy is a wardrobe consultant at A La Mode Wardrobe Consulting. www.alamodewc.com. She is also a passionate speaker for women’s events, sharing on the topic of “Loving Who You Are,” a message of self-esteem. Kathy is also a songwriter and vocalist, and has released several CDs of original music. She has been married to Peter for twenty-eight years and is the mom of three.

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